The Connections of Blindness and the Brain Essay

The encephalon and the head are one and can non be separated. while the encephalon is a physical thing the head on the other manus is considered to be mental. The encephalon is constructed of nervus cells. blood vass. and etc. . whereas the head is amorphous. The encephalon is an of import organ in the human organic structure since it controls all the maps and activities. The head on the other manus is the centre of the nervous system ; it coordinates the motions and ideas. The Mind lets an single understand things but the encephalon is in charge of directing the signals to the head. Oliver Sacks in “The Mind’s Eye” uses the instance surveies of John Hull. Zoltan Torey. and Lusseyran to demo that the head and encephalon both run each other even without the ability of vision by larning to counterbalance and accommodate after neurological upsets took their ability to see off from them.

In the instance survey of John Hull. Sacks negotiations about how this writer goes wholly blind by age 40 eight yet is still able to develop his head and encephalon to both run each other even without their vision by larning to counterbalance. Sacks believes that Hull is a great illustration of how an single deprived of one signifier of perceptual experience could wholly reshape himself to a new individuality. In Hull’s instance his encephalon signals were all right but it wasn’t registering in his head so in the terminal he lost complete recollection of sight even though he retained sight for his first 30 eight old ages. This strength of being from this universe means the “blindness now becomes for him ‘a dark. self-contradictory gift’ ” and Sacks even calls it a “a new focal point. a new freedom” ( 304 ) . Here both Hull’s head and encephalon are running each other and hence are able to counterbalance for his deficiency of vision. The self-contradictory gift refers to Hull deriving the ability to switch his attending to his other senses. His new freedom is the direct consequence of him losing sight. He is able to utilize his head to compose deeper and overall becomes intellectually and spiritually bolder though the usage of his encephalon which shops the cognition. Merely because he couldn’t see anything did non intend he started losing intelligence. as would be assumed. The head was able to signal and finally develop the encephalon so that Hull’s grew intellectually through his other senses. Sacks says. that it’s as if Hull had a new individuality. but in
fact it was merely the result of the encephalon and head working together. Furthermore. Hull is able to farther exemplify the connexion between the encephalon and the head by demoing a great sense of familiarity with nature. Hull says “Rain has a manner of conveying out the contours of everything ; it throws a colored cover over antecedently unseeable things ; alternatively of an intermittent and therefore disconnected universe. the steadily falling rain creates continuity of acoustic experience. . . presents the comprehensiveness of an full state of affairs all at one time. . . gives a sense of position and of the existent relationships of one portion of the universe to another” ( 304 ) . Here Hull uses 3-dimensional perceptual experience and imaginativeness to the bound to do his point. Hull is able to utilize his head to switch his attending to his other senses so that when it rains he can really separate where each and every bead lands merely by the sound of impact to the point that a alone experience is created which he has ne’er earlier experient. So even though Hull has gradual loss in seeing and shortly has complete extinction of ocular imagination which he calls ‘deep blindness’ he is still able to develop his head and encephalon side by side to utilize his other senses to force sightlessness to the side. Sacks farther negotiations about this preparation in Tracey’s instance.

In the instance survey of Zoltan Tracey. Sacks negotiations about how he received a missive from. Australian psychologist. Torey. who went blind at the age of 20 one due to an accident at a chemical works. Similar to Hull. Torey trained his head and encephalon to both run each other even without the ability of vision by larning to counterbalance his senses. Torey wrote in his book that unlike Hull he had trained his head to develop his ocular imagination even though he was advised to exchange from a ocular to an audile manner of accommodation. Since he was a psychologist Torey understood that if he kept imagination in pattern his encephalon would register it. This means that Torey was able to “construct an imagined ocular universe that seemed about as existent and intense to him as the perceptual 1 he had lost—and. so. sometimes more existent. more intense. a kind of controlled dream or hallucination” ( Sacks 306 ) . This shows merely how closely the head and encephalon must hold worked together to make about a dream like idea in his head. This universe that Torey was able to accurately build in his head is farther shown in his narrative in which he is able to alter his troughs on the roof of his house
wholly by himself. Sacks says that he was able to finish such a undertaking due to the fact that he was able to hold on ocular idea into his head and imitate the actions of the encephalon. This preparation of the head that Torey patterns was done by traveling against the norm of “rebuilding his representation of the universe on the footing of hearing and touch and to bury about sight and visualising altogether” ( 307 ) . Torey had a immense advantage in since he was a psychologist. significance he knew how to develop his head and encephalon at the same clip so he could utilize his imagination in a thoughtful manner. This power of imagination was so important to Torey that he visualized the encephalon “as a ageless juggle act of interacting routines” ( 308 ) . He understood the lone manner to engrain something in his encephalon is by practising the same modus operandi in many different ways so that it becomes a norm to the head excessively. Sacks farther explores this thought in Lusseyran’s instance.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

In the instance survey of Lusseyran. the Gallic Resistance combatant went blind even before he was eight old ages old. Similar to Torey. Lusseyran stated to build and to utilize an fanciful ocular universe where he trained his head and encephalon to both run each other even without the ability of vision by larning to counterbalance his senses. Lusseyran says. “ ‘A blind individual has a better sense of experiencing. of gustatory sensation. of touch. ’ and speaks of these as ‘the gifts of the blind’ ” ( 313 ) . When he says gifts of the blind he truly means that even though he is blind he is able to maximise his other senses to the point that it makes up for his sight. Sacks writes that it was his “supernormal powers of visual image and ocular manipulation—visualizing people’s place and motion. the topography of any infinite. visualising schemes for defence and attack” ( 312 ) . Lusseyran was able to develop his head and finally ingrain in his encephalon what and how to find a treasonist even though he was wholly unsighted. Sacks calls his visual image occult since he trained himself to the point that he was an icon in the Gallic Resistance. However. Lusseyran couldn’t merely execute drills like Torey and keep visual image since he was a batch younger when he went blind. This shows merely how much attempt he had to set in and merely how important powers of visual image were to Lusseyran to the point that he mastered Braille ( 312 ) . So by get downing immature in developing his head and encephalon. he was able to unite all his senses and hence he was successful.

Oliver Sacks in “The Mind’s Eye” uses the instance surveies of three successful blind persons named John Hull. Zoltan Torey. and Lusseyran who were able to run interchangeably run their head and encephalon by larning to counterbalance and set after neurological upsets take their ability to see off from them. The encephalon and the head are one and can non be separated. but while the encephalon is a physical thing and the head on the other manus is mental. John Hull illustrates this since even though two old ages after going wholly blind. Hull had become so non ocular as to resemble person who had been blind from birth yet he was still able to act as a ‘whole-body seer’ ( 304 ) . This means that Hull. person who had wholly lost his imagination. was able to get the better of that and switch his head to his other senses so that his encephalon was able to bring forth a new power and strength for him. Similarly. Zoltan Torey demonstrates this daring by building an fanciful ocular universe by developing his head and traveling against what he was supposed to make. Torey was able to make this to the point that he able to multiply four-figure Numberss by merely visualising the whole operation in his head and painting the suboperations in different colourss ( 308 ) . However. Torey. unlike Hull. played a more active function in constructing up his ocular imagination. since he practiced at place with ocular imagination. and was used to pull stringsing it in his ain manner ; in the terminal both Hull and Torey were able to utilize their head to do the best of their state of affairs. Last. Lusseyran paralleled Hull and Torey by building a screen in his head upon which whatever he thought or wanted appeared. He was able to develop his head so much that his able was able to bring forth ‘supernormal’ powers of visual image. In the terminal John Hull. Zoltan Torey. and Lusseyran were able show merely how closely the head and the encephalon have to work together so that sightlessness get in the manner.

Plants Cited

Miller. Richard. Kurt Spellmeyer. and Oliver Sacks. comp. “The Mind’s Eye” . 4th Ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning. 2012. Print.

x

Hi!
I'm James!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out