Sports Loman family. In highschool Biff played

Sports over the years have become one of the most leading sources of entertainment in society. Today, sports are a key part of lifestyle and relaxation. Sports have become an major outlet for success, people all over the world are receiving offers to go to big division one schools for being outstanding at sports. The attention to sports appears in both August Wilson’s Fences and Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. Both Death of a Salesman and Fences portray sports negatively, putting down sports, despite talent and dedication. First of all, sports are very important to the Loman family. In highschool Biff played football. Biff had a great talent at football and although he seemed to have the brightest future, he did not accept Bernard’s help for math. He did not accept Bernard’s help because he was convinced he would be able to get father in life with his athletic ability and popularity alone. He thinks this due to his father telling him, “Bernard can get the best marks in school, y’understand, but when he gets out in the business world, y’understand, you are going to be five times ahead of him.”(Miller). Bernard and his family are bigger on school than sports. If you compare an athletic family like the Lomans and a more academic family like Bernard’s and analyse how they both turned out later in life you would see major differences. Biff and Happy are both lost in life whereas Bernard has life figured out. This shows that Bernard, a person that was not big into sports, turned out better in the end than both Happy and Biff.Sports have a big impact on the Maxson family because Troy’s life is defined by baseball and he often brings up baseball when he is talking about conflicts in the story between him and his family. In Fences Troy Maxson used to play baseball but he did not get far because he believes racism held him back from going to the Major League. While this may hold some truth, Troy comprehensively ignores the fact that he spent fifteen years in prison and basically threw his life away. The shadow of his baseball career glooms over him for years to come making Troy a bitter man. As a result of this, Troy starts to sabotage his son, Cory’s, football career. When speaking about why he will not let Cory play football, Troy says, “I got sense enough not to let my boy get hurt playing no sports” (Wilson). He says this because he does not want Cory to have a defeated sports career resembling a career that Troy had. Troy’s best friend, Bono, says, “Times have changed, Troy, you just come along too early” (Wilson). What Troy does not understand is that he was born too early and is too old to play integrated baseball. The consequences in these plays are tremendous. When Biff decides to not listen to Bernard and study for math he ends up failing. A lot of this was because Willy let him get away with anything like stealing and never cheered him on to do well in school. He had the option to go to summer school to makeup the credits to able to graduate but this was around the time when Biff found out his Dad was cheating on his Mom. This ends up hindering his chances to go to college because colleges do not want athletes that fail their classes. Additionally when Cory quit his job at the A&P supermarket this made his Dad furious and his Dad refused to sign the permission papers agreeing to send Cory to play college football. Both Death of a Salesman and Fences portray sports negatively. As Arthur Miller and August Wilson portray perfectly, athleticism is not consistently akin with success. Today many parents often push their kids to do sports that they might not want to do because they believe that playing sports is they gateway to success nevertheless, is it really worth the time away from school and homework?