Change the freedom from fear, never faded.

Change
is inevitable in all things. The world is faced with new conflicts, or old ones
resurface as a result of the progression of technology, business, and culture.
However, at their center, the most important concepts to us as human beings, such
as freedom, remain the same.

Americans
were given a powerful message through President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s
Four Freedoms Speech, during the speech, Roosevelt gave a list of four
essential freedoms to strive for in the future. These freedoms consist of
“freedom of speech and expression – everywhere in the world,” “freedom of every
person to worship God in his own way – everywhere in the world,” “freedom from
want,” and “freedom from fear.”
When President Roosevelt gave this speech, he didn’t focus on it only being on a
national scale; rather, he focused on it as being a shared, international goal,
having kept in mind that, just as freedom would remain the same at its core for
a long time coming, it would also remain as something desired by the entire
world.

In
relatively recent years, President Barack Obama addressed a very similar topic
during a welcome speech. The similarity in the topics of their speeches demonstrate
how the conflicts being faced may have changed since Roosevelt was, but the
desire for freedom, more specifically the freedom from fear, never faded. “We
believe that our citizens should be able to live free from fear. So, like
generations before us, we stand united in the defense of our countries and
against those who would terrorize our people, or endanger the globe with the
world’s most dangerous weapons.” President Obama’s reference to terrorism shows
the changes that the world continually goes through, but the overarching theme
is that we wanted freedom from fear then, and we still want it now.

President
Roosevelt and President Obama spoke not only for their own times, but for the
times that will come after them. They addressed current events directly, but
they also kept their eyes on the reality that Americans – and people around the
entire world – will always want core freedoms, including the freedom from fear.
In the decades to come, terrorism may not be the primary concern of citizens of
the world, but people will still hope to live without fear, and they will look
to their leaders to reiterate this essential freedom to others.